Learn To Be Invisible

"As you can see from the screengrab below, this week the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Department is using LEEDIR to gather photos and videos from eyewitnesses of a chaotic street party in Isla Vista that led to over 100 arrests. Sheriff’s investigators hope the images they receive will allow them to ID more suspects. According to today’s announcement, agencies might typically retain uploaded content for a month or two, then delete it. But there’s no requirement to delete it, nor is there a guarantee of true anonymity for uploaders, though you do not have to provide your name."
— 3 days ago with 5 notes
nprfreshair:

Today investigative reporter Julia Angwin speaks to Fresh Air about her extreme efforts to erase her digital footprint. Part of that work involved developing a better understanding of what kind of data is out there and where it comes from. Here she explains data brokers:

"Data brokers began by compiling very simple information from the Yellow Pages, the White Pages and government directories. The property records in your state are publicly on file somewhere, the data brokers will go buy it and put it in their dossier. At the same time, your address is usually on-file [in] many places with magazines or newspapers you subscribe to. … Also the post office sells access to its change of address list.
What’s happening now in the digital era is that they’re adding to their files with all sorts of digital information, so they can find out about you, what you’re doing online, what you’re buying online. … So now these records that they have are getting much more precise. They’re no longer just being used to send you junk mail that you can throw away. Now they’re being used online as well to help places figure out who you are as soon as you arrive at their website. They can make an instant assessment by matching your online stuff to some of the online data…


I found out there are a lot of data brokers out there. It took me almost a month to compile a list, because there’s no real list of who are they all, and I was able to identify about 200 or so of them. Of those, very few were willing to let me see my data. It was about a dozen that would let me see my data: some of the bigger brokers, LexisNexis, Axium, and some very small outfits.
… What was shocking about it was that it ranged from incredibly precise — every single address I’d ever lived at including the number on my dorm room in college, which I couldn’t even remember … to very imprecise, inaccurate things … that were not at all true — that I was a single mother … with no college education living in a place I didn’t live.”


Angwin’s book is called Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance
graffiti by Banksy 

nprfreshair:

Today investigative reporter Julia Angwin speaks to Fresh Air about her extreme efforts to erase her digital footprint. Part of that work involved developing a better understanding of what kind of data is out there and where it comes from. Here she explains data brokers:

"Data brokers began by compiling very simple information from the Yellow Pages, the White Pages and government directories. The property records in your state are publicly on file somewhere, the data brokers will go buy it and put it in their dossier. At the same time, your address is usually on-file [in] many places with magazines or newspapers you subscribe to. … Also the post office sells access to its change of address list.

What’s happening now in the digital era is that they’re adding to their files with all sorts of digital information, so they can find out about you, what you’re doing online, what you’re buying online. … So now these records that they have are getting much more precise. They’re no longer just being used to send you junk mail that you can throw away. Now they’re being used online as well to help places figure out who you are as soon as you arrive at their website. They can make an instant assessment by matching your online stuff to some of the online data…

I found out there are a lot of data brokers out there. It took me almost a month to compile a list, because there’s no real list of who are they all, and I was able to identify about 200 or so of them. Of those, very few were willing to let me see my data. It was about a dozen that would let me see my data: some of the bigger brokers, LexisNexis, Axium, and some very small outfits.

… What was shocking about it was that it ranged from incredibly precise — every single address I’d ever lived at including the number on my dorm room in college, which I couldn’t even remember … to very imprecise, inaccurate things … that were not at all true — that I was a single mother … with no college education living in a place I didn’t live.”

Angwin’s book is called Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance

graffiti by Banksy 

— 1 month ago with 323 notes
#fresh air  #interview  #julia angwin  #data surveillance  #NSA  #privacy  #digital footprint 
"

The document indicates the passenger tracking operation was a trial run of a powerful new software program CSEC was developing with help from its U.S. counterpart, the National Security Agency.

In the document, CSEC called the new technologies “game-changing,” and said they could be used for tracking “any target that makes occasional forays into other cities/regions.”

Sources tell CBC News the technologies tested on Canadians in 2012 have since become fully operational.

CSEC claims “no Canadian or foreign travellers’ movements were ‘tracked,’” although it does not explain why it put the word “tracked” in quotation marks.

"
— 2 months ago with 1 note
#you are being watched  #wifi 
youranonnews:

How the cops watch your tweets in real-time
Arstechnica’s Nate Anderson breaks down NSA programs like BlueJay – which provides real-time, geo-fenced access to every single public tweet so that local police can keep tabs on #gunfire, #meth, and #protest (yes, those are real examples) in their communities
Read the full story here.

youranonnews:

How the cops watch your tweets in real-time

Arstechnica’s Nate Anderson breaks down NSA programs like BlueJay – which provides real-time, geo-fenced access to every single public tweet so that local police can keep tabs on #gunfire, #meth, and #protest (yes, those are real examples) in their communities

Read the full story here.

(via brucesterling)

— 2 months ago with 280 notes
#you are being watched  #twitter  #nsa  #bluejay 
CCC-TV - The Internet (Doesn't) Need Another Security Guide →

As Internet privacy/security professionals and amateur enthusiasts, we are often asked to give advice about best practices in this field. Sometimes this takes the form of one-on-one advice to our friends, sometimes it’s training a room full of people, and sometimes you may be asked to write a blog post or a brief guide or an entire curriculum. This talk will survey the current Internet privacy guide landscape and discuss the perils and pitfalls of creating this type of resource, using the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Surveillance Self Defense project as a case study.

— 2 months ago with 1 note

DNA Spoofing: DIY Counter Surveillance

— 2 months ago
#genetic testing 
thesuperfeyneednoshoes:

the-king-in-yellow:

ninjabikeslut:

"Facial-recognition technology is quickly becoming a mainstay of commercial and government surveillance systems. While it can provide benefits in automation and security, it is also a threat to privacy. Sophisticated algorithms can already extract information about your gender, age and even mood from a single image, and then link those physical attributes to commercial or government databases."-Face to Anti-Face

The most cyberpunk post on this website, possibly ever. 

For future reference.

thesuperfeyneednoshoes:

the-king-in-yellow:

ninjabikeslut:

"Facial-recognition technology is quickly becoming a mainstay of commercial and government surveillance systems. While it can provide benefits in automation and security, it is also a threat to privacy. Sophisticated algorithms can already extract information about your gender, age and even mood from a single image, and then link those physical attributes to commercial or government databases."
-Face to Anti-Face

The most cyberpunk post on this website, possibly ever. 

For future reference.

(via bluepixelplanet)

— 2 months ago with 28624 notes

brucesterling:

prostheticknowledge:

DIY Phone Signal Blocking Pouch

Instructions from the KILLYOURPHONE.COM workshops to create a simple tech privacy-focused pouch for your signal sending device:

The pouch has a very simple design. Of course you are invited make something more fashionable but this version is very easy to make and it works. Make it any size you want! (Tablet etc) To make it fit most common current smart phones I usually make the pouch 10 x 20 cm. IMPORTANT: What ever you do make sure you fold the material on all sides to make sure the radio waves can’t get through!!

Tutorial for a 10 x 20 cm pouch:

  1. Cut 12 cm stripes from your roll [HF+LF Shielding] blocking fleece.
  2. Make pieces of 50 x 12 cm, each for one pouch. (i.e. from a 1 m roll stripe you’ll get 2 pieces.)
  3. Fold your 50 x 12 cm piece in length to 25 x 12 cm
  4. Fold again the long sides, each 1 cm and pin them with needles.
  5. Sew two straight seams on the left and right side.
  6. Fold the opening at least 2 times! Find a paper clip or clamp to close the pouch.
  7. Done!

The project also has a FAQ for doubters … you can check the project’s website with more valuable information here

*But… but WHY would I want to stick my beloved cellphone into a radiation-proof homemade Faraday sack?

*Because it’s constantly ratting you out to data-miners whether you touch it or not, that’s why:

http://www.theverge.com/2014/1/16/5316178/nsas-dishfire-program-said-to-capture-nearly-200m-texts-a-day

Nearly 200 million text messages a day are being collected from people around the globe by the National Security Agency as part of a secret program called “Dishfire.” That’s according to a new report from The Guardian and the UK’s Channel 4 News service, aided by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. As part of the program, so-called “untargeted” texts are collected then analyzed by a separate service called “Prefer,” which is capable of pulling together detailed reports for the agency. News of the program comes from an internal NSA presentation dated June 2011, which refers to SMS text messages as “a goldmine to exploit.”

"A GOLDMINE TO EXPLOIT"

Some of the information captured by the program includes names, phone numbers, and images, though other seemingly basic alerts offer a closer look at someone’s habits. Three such examples are texts from banks and other services about financial transactions, detailed meeting information from calendar invites, as well as messages from wireless phone carriers that are sent when borders are crossed. The program also kept track of missed calls, passwords, and information about SIM cards….

— 2 months ago with 909 notes

nachttour:

thorhugs:

compactcarl:

egriz:

im not even an artist and these prices are hurting my feelings 

This is what I have to dig through every time I look for new jobs to apply for.

For non-artists, let’s give you a little perspective.

For me, an illustration takes a bare minimum of 6 hours. Mind you, that’s JUST the drawing part. Not the research, or the communications, or gathering information. Just drawing.

That’s if it’s a simple illustration.

My art deco or more detailed stuff can take 20+ hours each.

Even simple, cartoony things still take at least 3 hours.

Let’s go with the second one. 2 illustrations for $25. Figuring 6 hours each. 12 hours total, for JUST the drawings. That’s approximately $2.08/hour. 

Asking these prices is an insult. But what’s even more hurtful is there are people out there that will take these jobs. Which only encourages rates like this to be acceptable. And there are people who will try to say these are just what you have to do to get started.

I believed that. So my first coloring gigs were just $10/page. The day someone offered me $25/page for just flatting work, I realized just how wrong I’d been. I’m still not making the rates I’d like, but now I refuse anything below $25/page. Because there is value in my time.

In any standardized industry, even ones that pay piece rate over hourly, these numbers are criminal.

Do your fellow artists a favor. Never accept jobs like these. There are others that pay legitimate rates. Or at least closer to legitimate.

I make more than some of those jobs slinging lattes. *_*

Coming out of baby school, just community college mind you, my instructors told me ‘don’t take a job for under 15/hr’.  That is not with large degrees. I now have said large degrees and these prices make me want to vomit in my mouth a little. If I can be paid halfway decently to make coffee, then I would assume that you would want to pay your artist MORE THAN A THIRD OF MINIMUM WAGE to create your product. 

Otherwise how do you expect that 1) people with the skills you seek will be stupid enough to take your job, and 2) how do you expect your artist to care about the finished product when what you are paying them does not even amount to a full tank of gas on a mid-sized vehicle. 

(via teratocybernetics)

— 3 months ago with 35044 notes
#art woes  #stab and stab and stab